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New Brunswick

Express Entry update

3687 Invitations To Apply were issued in yesterday’s Express Entry draw, with the minimum Comprehensive Ranking System points standing at 415. As with the April 19th draw, this is the lowest number of points required by applicants since Express Entry started. So your chances of receiving an ITA are looking better than ever! And for the most part, applications are being processed within the promised 6 months.

Atlantic provinces

If you’re still undecided about where to settle in Canada, it’s certainly worth considering the eastern provinces: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland & Labrador, and PEI. With huge labour shortages looming there over the next decade, these provinces are now being much more proactive in their efforts to attract immigrants. This is reflected in the introduction of the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program. And recently New Brunswick has been holding job fairs in the US, seeking to capitalise on the understandable uncertainty that many Americans are feeling right now.

Cabot Trail, Nova Scotia

Ontario house prices

For people choosing to move to Ontario, southern and southwest Ontario remain popular destinations. So it’s disappointing to see that the crazy Toronto house market is driving up prices in those areas. Places like Hamilton, Windsor, London, and the Waterloo-Kitchener area have seen house prices increase by between 20-30% within the last year. Even somewhat less built-up areas like Peterborough, Barrie, and the Niagara Region are seeing the same effect. The average house price in Canada is now almost $550,000, although if you take Toronto and Vancouver out of the equation, this would drop to around $390,000.

Hopefully the recent measures brought in to calm the Toronto market will have an impact. And it’s good to know that the new 15% “non-resident speculation tax” won’t affect new immigrants. Rebates will be available for temporary foreign workers, international students, and people who later become permanent residents or Canadian citizens.

Niagara River

Manitoba

Heading further west, Manitoba has announced a renewed commitment to its Provincial Nominee Program. After clearing a massive backlog, it’s now promising 6-month completions for new applications and additional pathways to permanent residency for international students. It predicts that immigrants will be needed to fill 25% of its likely 170,000 job openings between now and 2022. And with news that seniors now outnumber children in Canada, it’s a safe bet we’re going to see some serious competition between the provinces for skilled immigrants in the years ahead.

Crow Cottage at Wawanaisa Resort

Playtime

It’s finally here! After the long winter, we’ve reached the Victoria Day long weekend. This is the unofficial start of summer when Canadians open up their cottages, dust down classic cars, RVs, and boats, and barbecue/beer/deck time starts in earnest. I’m looking forward to getting our Corvette on the road and doing some hiking. I’m also finishing up a revised version of Moving To Canada. More details coming soon!

 

 

There’s a lot to get through this month! Let’s start with some economic news. Latest results show better than expected economic figures in Canada with growth across manufacturing, wholesale trade, the retail sector, construction, mining, and oil and gas.

Innovation and job creation are the watch words right now with federal and Ontario liberals announcing new projects and dispensing big sums of money this week. More IT and engineering jobs could be on the horizon in Windsor and Ottawa with huge government investment in research and engineering. Meanwhile, Ontario is establishing the futuristic-sounding Vector Institute, a centre for AI research. I’m pleased that some money is coming to Northern Ontario too with an engineering and sciences research centre in the works at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay.

Express entry

On to Express Entry and yes, it’s being tweaked again.  They aren’t huge changes compared with last year’s. This time the emphasis is on adaptability factors such as language and family, with the aim of bringing in more French speakers to strengthen Francophone minority communities in Canada.

Currently, you can score up to 136 points for your first official language and up to 24 for the second. This won’t change, but as of  June 6th you’ll qualify for extra points if you have “strong French language skills” plus ability in English. This will be judged via the standardized language tests that all Express Entry candidates have to complete. If your French is assessed at intermediate level or better and you have basic level English you can gain an extra 15 points. Those French skills combined with intermediate level or higher English? That can net you up to 30 extra points.

Another change–and somewhere simpler to follow–if you (or your spouse) have a sibling who is already a permanent resident or citizen in Canada, you’ll gain an extra 15 points. Your sibling must be 18 or older.

Finally, if you’re applying to immigrate but don’t have a job offer or provincial nomination, you’re no longer required to set up a Job Bank account. This will become voluntary.

The number of Invitations To Apply (ITAs) issued in the latest Express Entry draw was down on the previous one–3749 compared to 3884, and the points requirements went up slightly to 441 from 434. But overall, total ITAs are up by over 50% for the first 3 months of this year as compared to last–a very positive sign.

Canadian flag

Atlantic Canada

New Brunswick perhaps isn’t always top of mind when deciding where to settle in Canada but it’s definitely out to attract more immigrants. The province and the federal government have just signed the first ever Canada-New Brunswick immigration agreement. The aim is to bring in more skilled workers to address their labour shortages, and they are especially keen to attract French speakers.

In fact, there is a strong push to bring in more immigrants to all four of Canada’s Atlantic provinces and IRCC is reporting strong employer interest in the Atlantic Immigration Pilot program.

Ontario

In other news, Ontario is expanding its Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) with the number of nominees increasing this year to 6000. If you work in ICT you’ll be interested to know that a quarter of Ontario provincial nominees are working in this field. Although things have perhaps declined a little from the Blackberry/RIM heyday, the IT sector is still thriving especially in the Kitchener-Waterloo region.

If you want to get an idea of what Ontario’s top public sector employees are earning, take a look at the annual “sunshine list” published on Friday. It lists the salaries of all public sector workers who earn more than $100k. As salaries surge higher with inflation, there’s much debate as to whether the 100k threshold is meaningful anymore. But it’s still interesting to browse and see the types of jobs in there. And if you live in Ontario, it’s fun to be nosy and look up people that you know :-) The list is no longer just directors and managers but also teachers (elementary and secondary), professors, registered nurses, firefighters, IT team leads, and police constables.

And finally…

And speaking of sunshine (did you like that link? :-) ), it’s the time of year when Canadians are done with winter and looking ahead to spring. Spring is officially here, although it’s been a little difficult to tell. Sunday and Monday were hazardous with freezing rain. My yard was an ice rink and I had to battle my way into my frozen canvas portable garage with little icicles flying everywhere. Thankfully I didn’t slip on the ice, but I know many people who weren’t so lucky. Since then, temperatures are up, and a lot of snow has melted. I’m sure the barbecues and patio furniture have already been wheeled out in Canadian Tire, and apparently a few people have already been spotted wearing T-shirts :-)