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The first year of Express Entry (2015) was generally seen as a success with 31,000 ITAs (invitations to apply) being issued (that’s out of a pool of just over 191,000 applications) and 80% of cases processed within the target six month time frame. However, I have to admit to being surprised when I saw the list of top occupations for successful applicants:

food service workers and cooks
information systems analysts, software engineers, computer programmers and interactive media developers
university professors and lecturers
retail sales supervisors
graphic designers and illustrators
financial auditors and accountants, and financial investment analysts

With the exception of IT, these don’t immediately strike me as areas where Canada is lacking in job applicants. Where are the engineers, trades people, or medical professionals? It’ll be interesting to see whether there’s a big difference to the make-up of this list in a year or two after the latest changes to Express Entry.

The new rules which took effect on November 19th, are aiming to “better attract some of the best minds in the world, including former international students, experienced professionals and talented workers who will strengthen Canada’s competitiveness in the global marketplace.” Let’s take a look at the changes and what they might mean for you.

Job offers

The biggest change is in the area of job offers. Previously, a job offer supported by an LMIA (Labour Market Impact Assessment) would gain you a hefty 600 CRS (Comprehensive Ranking System) points towards your application. This has now been drastically reduced and depends on what NOC category the job falls into. Anything classed as 00 qualifies for 200 points; 0/A/B just 50 points.

Previously, all applicants with a job offer had to provide an LMIA. Now if you’re already working in Canada on an LMIA-exempt work permit, you’ll qualify for job offer points without the LMIA, so long as you’ve been working for your employer for at least a year. And your job offer no longer has to be for a permanent post, just a minimum of a year’s contract.

Education gained in Canada

Anyone from outside of Canada who has gained a qualification here higher than high school level, from 1 and 2 diplomas up, will receive extra education points. A one or two year diploma gains you an extra 15 points. If you have a bachelor’s degree or higher, it’s 30 points.

More time!

You’ll now have longer to complete your application after receiving the invitation to apply – 90 days instead of 60. Remembering how long it took me to organise police checks from 2 countries and the very long wait for medical checks, more time is definitely a good thing!

Good or bad?

The new changes are great news for temporary workers in Canada, especially those in more contract-based professions such as the trades, and for Canada’s international students too. And it makes complete sense that Canada would want to retain them. They are already settled here, have built connections and have the language skills. During the first year of Express Entry, almost 80% of successful applicants were drawn from people already living in Canada, so this figure could well increase.

But what about the thousands of skilled workers trying to move here from outside Canada? Will it now be even more difficult to get in? Certainly the job offer is not going to help you as much. However, if you don’t have a job offer and have specialised skills that are in demand in Canada, you’ll now stand a better chance of acceptance. The prime focus now is on bringing in highly skilled individuals to fulfill specific demands. So if you have skills that Canada desperately needs, the lack of job offer is not a deal breaker.

For official details of the changes, go to

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/notices/2016-11-19.asp

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