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I love this time of year when the days are long and hot here in Northern Ontario and the pace of life has slowed up for the summer. This weekend I’m hoping for some road trips with my husband in our Corvette–something we’ve not been able to do in a long time. So that will make this Canada Day holiday extra special.

This last week has made me reflect how lucky we are to have moved here. Canada may not be perfect, but compared to the turmoil in some other countries right now, I think we have it pretty good. You can read about my top ten best things about living here and my best moments so far.

Lake of the Woods trail - the newest trail at Killarney Park

In my post about Canadian immigration changes for 2016, I mentioned the spike in “Move to Canada’ searches from people in the US. With Trump now the official Republican candidate, US interest in moving north will surely only increase.

And now we have the Brexit effect. Apparently Google statistics showed at one point that moving to Canada was a hotter topic in the UK than even David Beckham. I thought the vote would be close, but really wasn’t expecting that result. It makes me sad, especially as the West Midlands, where I’m originally from, had the highest percentage vote for “leave”. I didn’t vote. Perhaps I could have done as I still hold a UK passport, but didn’t feel I had the right to now I no longer live there.

Canadian and UK passports

Brits or Americans considering moving here will be in good company.  The UK and the US are in the top ten source countries for Canadian immigrants and the US is also one of the top ten sources of international students in Canada. Sharing a common language and similar culture definitely helps ease the transition during those first weeks and months.

Immigrants mostly settle in large cities within Ontario, B.C., Quebec, and Alberta and almost two thirds opt for the big three: Toronto, Vancouver, and Montreal. Calgary and Ottawa are the next most popular choices. But don’t feel that these are the only options. Canada’s smaller provinces and smaller towns can also provide a fantastic quality of life (I can testify to that!) and are keen to grow their immigrant populations.

So will we see a big influx of Canadian immigrants from the UK and US in the next few years? I think it will depend in large part on how political events unfold. For anyone thinking of making the move, best of luck in your research and Happy Canada Day!

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